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Great opening at the A.I.R. Gallery

On May 26th we had our National Artists exhibit opening reception at the A.I.R. Gallery. It was a superlative evening. How fortunate I am to belong to this wonderful gallery with its amazing history and exciting prospects for the future. The curator, Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, discussed each artist’s work, was friendly and accessible. The artists and other attendees were kind and approachable, with none of the snobbery so prevalent in the New York art world. I left the opening enthused, eager to learn more about the gallery from the archives at the Fales Library and Special Collections, and to contribute as much as I am able. I have included two pictures from the evening, along with links to each artist’s website. (please scroll down for links)

Collage: Top: cover of catalog; middle, L to R: Aranda-Alvarado discussing artist's work, painting detail Mineko Yoshida, detail art by Jody Joldersma, detail art by Amy Swartele,; bottom L to R: National Artist poster by Julia Kim Smith, monotype detail by Patty Smith, installation by Melissa Furness, mixed media by Julia Kim Smith
Collage: Top: cover of catalog; middle, L to R: Aranda-Alvarado discussing artist’s work, painting detail Mineko Yoshida, detail art by Jody Joldersma, detail art by Amy Swartele,; bottom L to R: National Artist poster by Julia Kim Smith, monotype detail by Patty Smith, installation by Melissa Furness, mixed media by Julia Kim Smith
Paintings shown at the National Artists Exhibition
Paintings shown at the National Artists Exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artists: d’Ann de Simone, Dani Dodge, Shannon Forrester, Melissa Furness, Alisa Henriquez, Jody Joldersma, Mary-Ann Kokoska, Mimi Oritsky, Ekaterina Popova, Meghan Quinn, Julia Kim Smith, Patty Smith, Ann Stoddard, Amy Swartele, Erin Wiersma, Joo Yeon Woo, Janet Decker Yanez, Mineko Yoshida

Some helpful advice

I received some helpful advice from a gallery owner. The exact words were: push your paint application, and let the paint tell you what to do
rather than your idea(s) of what it should look like.

So here is day one of taking that advice. It feels freeing, as this is something I have struggled with since I began painting.

Being free; letting the paint guide me

More on Otto Dix’s work

Talking to a colleague about the Dix exhibit has me thinking more about the medium of etching being ideal for the series on war. The process of etching utilizes an acid bath to create lines. The longer the plate sits in the bath, the darker the lines will appear when printed. The war series that Dix created depicts the corrosive and harsh effects that chemical warfare, used for the first time in this particularly devastating war, had on the people involved. So, as both a process, and for this subject matter, the medium was an ideal choice.

To further clarify what I stated in my last posting, the painting does not deliver the same sense of ‘eating away’. It relies predominantly on the actual visages and bodies depicted to convey the corruption of society, and the individual within a corrupt society. There is almost no sensuous quality to be found in the paint itself. Oil paint is a sensuous, almost voluptuous medium. Dix shies away from these inherent qualities, and his paintings suffer for it. They leave the viewer cold, while the etchings and drawings do not.

Trials and troubles of Dog-faced Buddha

Names of cross dressing women from history
Page from my sketchbook
And another
And another--it has been a long, hard two weeks

oil on canvas

It has been awhile since my last post. I am working on myself, and it is difficult. Finding that change is necessary, I have enlisted the help of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. In addition to spending my free time meditating, I have made a Buddhist Prayer Flag, which I have hung in my office at my day job. It is all about not giving in to the same actions that have brought the same results for years. Dog-faced Buddha is working overtime, flapping her bony wings to get from here to there.