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drawing

Great opening at the A.I.R. Gallery

On May 26th we had our National Artists exhibit opening reception at the A.I.R. Gallery. It was a superlative evening. How fortunate I am to belong to this wonderful gallery with its amazing history and exciting prospects for the future. The curator, Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, discussed each artist’s work, was friendly and accessible. The artists and other attendees were kind and approachable, with none of the snobbery so prevalent in the New York art world. I left the opening enthused, eager to learn more about the gallery from the archives at the Fales Library and Special Collections, and to contribute as much as I am able. I have included two pictures from the evening, along with links to each artist’s website. (please scroll down for links)

Collage: Top: cover of catalog; middle, L to R: Aranda-Alvarado discussing artist's work, painting detail Mineko Yoshida, detail art by Jody Joldersma, detail art by Amy Swartele,; bottom L to R: National Artist poster by Julia Kim Smith, monotype detail by Patty Smith, installation by Melissa Furness, mixed media by Julia Kim Smith
Collage: Top: cover of catalog; middle, L to R: Aranda-Alvarado discussing artist’s work, painting detail Mineko Yoshida, detail art by Jody Joldersma, detail art by Amy Swartele,; bottom L to R: National Artist poster by Julia Kim Smith, monotype detail by Patty Smith, installation by Melissa Furness, mixed media by Julia Kim Smith
Paintings shown at the National Artists Exhibition
Paintings shown at the National Artists Exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artists: d’Ann de Simone, Dani Dodge, Shannon Forrester, Melissa Furness, Alisa Henriquez, Jody Joldersma, Mary-Ann Kokoska, Mimi Oritsky, Ekaterina Popova, Meghan Quinn, Julia Kim Smith, Patty Smith, Ann Stoddard, Amy Swartele, Erin Wiersma, Joo Yeon Woo, Janet Decker Yanez, Mineko Yoshida

About my trip

Although the places we visited were extraordinarily beautiful, and the experiences we were fortunate to have, such as high tea at the Empress Hotel, were enjoyable and memorable, my neurotic side, ever vigilant, still found time to express itself. I believe this is due to being raised with my father’s favorite expression still repeating in my head: from laughing comes crying. But He may have heard it first in German: vor Lachen weinen kommt. I have switched to using pencil, rather than markers, so to see these images well they must be clicked on two times to view the largest size.

After a visit to the Butchart Gardens
Anticipating high tea at the Empress Hotel
This totem was on the Pacific Rim Trail
Illustrating some lines from a Margaret Atwood poem
Although this may seem out of context, it is appropriate for our trip.
My design for a totem
At last, some whimsy
A funny little drawing of my funnier little
A more serious portrait of Maryanne
Final farewell to British Columbia and our vacation

After reading about Tanrokubon

Hole in the head
From my sketchbook

I have been reading about Tanrokubon. The Japanese name derives from the three colors most often used in their execution. They are books that were composed of woodcuts which were then hand colored inexpertly, and very often by family members of the pressman, to keep costs down. There is a real roughness about them that intrigues me. They fit into my desire to allow emotional content to rise easily to the surface of a work. Here is my simple and inexpertly colored drawing of the Dog-faced Buddha with her hand in the hole on top of a fetus’s head, with the Buddha of lovingkindness pouring down her goodness from the heavens.